Is A Mac PC More Secure Than A Windows One?

No it is not.

May proponents of Apple would like you to believe a Mac is more secure. The truth is because there are so many more IBM based computers than there are Macs, the bad guys target them more readily. For example, there are (and I don’t know what the actual numbers are) 10 million pc’s and 2 million mac’s, and a virus maker gets a 4% return on their ransom ware, the probability of getting paid is much higher on the pc’s.

So you ask, why not then purchase a Mac? Well, here are my personal reasons.

A Mac is approximately 3 times as expensive as a PC…and they do the same thing. They work the same way. They use the same hardware…it just takes 3 times the resources (hardware) to run the Mac. All computers have two basic ‘parts’, hardware and software.

If the hardware is the same, then what’s the difference?

It’s getting better, but much of the software available as of this writing will not work on Mac.

Mac’s are pretty proprietary, that is, it is difficult to get parts for them and therefore difficult to get service on them, which means they often times need to be sent to an official Apple Repair Facility.

I’m just sayin’…

How To Determine What Is Causing The Issue After A Clean Boot

Windows 10, Windows 8.1, and Windows 8
  1. Log on to the computer by using an account that has administrator rights.
  2. From Start, search for msconfig. (In Windows 10, use the Search box from the Start menu. In Windows 8 or 8.1, swipe in from the right edge of the screen, and then tap Search. Or, if you are using a mouse, point to the lower-right corner of the screen, and then click Search.)
  3. Select msconfig or System Configuration from the search results.
  4. Tap or click the Services tab, and then tap or click to select the Hide all Microsoft services check box.
  5. Tap or click to select the upper half of the check boxes in the Service list.
  6. Tap or click OK, and then tap or click Restart.
  7. After the computer finishes restarting, determine whether the problem still occurs.
    • If the problem still occurs, repeat steps 1 through 6, but clear the lower half of the check boxes in the Service list that you originally selected.
    • If the problem does not occur, repeat steps 1 through 6, and select only the upper half of the remaining check boxes that are cleared in the Service list. Repeat these steps until you have selected all the check boxes.
    • If you still experience the problem when only one service is selected in the Service list, this means that the selected service causes the problem, and you should go to step 11. If no service causes the problem, go to step 8.
  8. Repeat steps 1 and 3 in this section.
  9. Tap or click the Startup tab, and then tap or click to select the upper half of the check boxes in the Startup Item list.
  10. Click OK, and then click Restart.
    • If the problem still occurs, repeat steps 8 and 9, but clear the lower half of the checked boxes in the Startup Item list that you originally selected.
    • If the problem does not occur, repeat steps 8 and 9, and select only the upper half of the remaining check boxes that are cleared in the Startup Item list. Repeat these steps until you have selected all the check boxes.
    • If you still experience the problem after only one Startup Item is selected in the Startup Item list, this means that the selected Startup Item causes the problem, and you should go to step 11. If no Startup Item causes this problem, a Microsoft service probably causes the problem. To determine which Microsoft service may be causing the problem, repeat steps 1 through 7 without selecting the Hide all Microsoft services check box in each step.
  11. After you determine the startup item or the service that causes the problem, contact the program manufacturer to determine whether the problem can be resolved. Or, run the System Configuration utility, and then tap or click to clear the check box for the problem item.
Windows 7 and Windows Vista
  1. Log on to the computer by using an account that has administrator rights.
  2. Click Start, type msconfig.exe in the Start Search box, and then press Enter to start the System Configuration utility.
    Note If you are prompted for an administrator password or for confirmation, you should type the password or provide confirmation.
    A screenshot for this step.
  3. Click the Services tab, and then click to select the Hide all Microsoft services check box.
  4. Click to select the upper half of the check boxes in the Service list.
  5. Click OK, and then click Restart.
  6. After the computer finishes restarting, determine whether the problem still occurs.
    • If the problem still occurs, repeat steps 1 through 5, but clear the lower half of the checked boxes in the Service list that you originally selected.
    • If the problem does not occur, repeat steps 1 through 5, and select only the upper half of the remaining check boxes that are cleared in the Service list. Repeat these steps until you have selected all the check boxes.
    • If you still experience the problem after only one service is selected in the Service list, this means that the selected service causes the problem. Go to step 10. If no service causes this problem, go to step 7.
  7. Perform a clean boot by repeating steps 1 and 2.
  8. Click the Startup tab, and then click to select the upper half of the check boxes in the Startup Item list. A screenshot for this step.
  9. Click OK, and then click Restart.
    • If the problem still occurs, repeat steps 7 and 8, but clear the lower half of the checked boxes in the Startup Item list that you originally selected.
    • If the problem does not occur, repeat steps 7 and 8, and select only the upper half of the remaining check boxes that are cleared in the Startup Item list. Repeat these steps until you have selected all the check boxes.
    • If you still experience the problem after only one Startup Item is selected in the Startup Item list, this means that the selected Startup Item causes the problem. Go to Step 10. If no Startup Item causes this problem, a Microsoft service probably causes the problem. To determine which Microsoft service may be causing the problem, repeat steps 1 through 6 without selecting the Hide all Microsoft services check box in either step.
  10. After you determine the startup item or the service that causes the problem, contact the program manufacturer to determine whether the problem can be resolved. Or, run the System Configuration utility, and then click to clear the check box for the problem item.

How To Restart Windows Normally After Clean Boot

After you have finished troubleshooting, follow these steps to reset the computer to start normally.

Windows 10, Windows 8.1, and Windows 8
  1. From Start, search for msconfig. (In Windows 10, use the Search box from the Start menu. In Windows 8 or 8.1, wipe in from the right edge of the screen, and then tap Search. Or, if you are using a mouse, point to the lower-right corner of the screen, and then click Search.)
  2. Select msconfig or System Configuration from the search results.
  3. On the General tab, tap or click the Normal Startup option.
  4. Tap or click the Services tab, clear the check box beside Hide all Microsoft services, and then tap or click Enable all.
  5. ap or click the Startup tab, and then tap or click Open Task Manager.
  6. In task manager, enable all of your startup programs, and then tap or click OK.
  7. When you are prompted to restart the computer, tap or click Restart.
Windows 7 and Windows Vista
  1. Click Start, type msconfig.exe in the Start Search box, and then press Enter.
    Note If you are prompted for an administrator password or for confirmation, you should type the password or click Continue.
  2. On the General tab, click the Normal Startup option, and then click OK.
  3. When you are prompted to restart the computer, click Restart.

How To Start The Windows Installer Service

If you run a Setup program without starting the Windows Installer service, you may receive the following error message:

The Windows Installer service could not be accessed. Contact your support personnel to verify that the windows Installer service is properly registered.

The Windows Installer service does not start if you clear the Load system services check box in the System Configuration utility. To use the Windows Installer service when system services are not loaded, you must start the service manually. To do this, follow these steps.

Windows 10, Windows 8.1, and Windows 8
  1. From Start, search for computer. (In Windows 10, use the Search box from the Start menu. In Windows 8 or 8.1, swipe in from the right edge of the screen, and then tap Search. Or, if you are using a mouse, point to the lower-right corner of the screen, and then click Search.)
  2. Right-click or swipe down on Computer in the search results, and then tap or click Manage.
  3. In the console tree, tap or click Services and Applications, and then tap or click Services.
  4. In the details pane, right-click or swipe down on Windows Installer, and then tap or click Start.
Windows 7 and Windows Vista
  1. Click Start, right-click Computer, and then click Manage.
    Note If you are prompted for an administrator password or for confirmation, type the password or provide confirmation.
  2. In the console tree, click Services and Applications, and then click Services.
  3. In the details pane, right-click Windows Installer, and then click Start.

How To Perform A Clean Boot In Windows

A clean boot is performed to start Windows by using a minimal set of drivers and startup programs. This helps eliminate software conflicts that occur when you install a program or an update or when you run a program in Windows 10, Windows 8.1, Windows 8, Windows 7, or Windows Vista. You may also troubleshoot or determine what conflict is causing the problem by performing a clean boot.
Why software conflicts occur?

When you start Windows by using a normal startup operation, several applications and services start automatically, and then run in the background. These programs include basic system processes, antivirus software, system utility applications, and other software that has been previously installed. These applications and services can cause software conflicts.
How to perform a clean boot

Notes

  • You must log on to the computer as an administrator to be able to perform a clean boot.
  • Your computer may temporarily lose some functionality when you perform a clean boot. When you start the computer normally, the functionality returns. However, you may receive the original error message, or experience the original behavior if the problem still exists.
  • If the computer is connected to a network, network policy settings may prevent you from following these steps. We strongly recommend that you do not use the System Configuration utility to change the advanced boot options on the computer unless a Microsoft support engineer directs you to do this. Doing this may make the computer unusable.

Use the following steps to perform a clean boot:

Windows 10
  1. From Start, search for msconfig.
  2. Select System Configuration from the search results.
  3. On the Services tab of the System Configuration dialog box, tap or click to select the Hide all Microsoft services check box, and then tap or click Disable all.
  4. On the Startup tab of the System Configuration dialog box, tap or click Open Task Manager.
  5. On the Startup tab in Task Manager, for each startup item, select the item and then click Disable.
  6. Close Task Manager.
  7. On the Startup tab of the System Configuration dialog box, tap or click OK, and then restart the computer.
Windows 8.1 and Windows 8
  1. Swipe in from the right edge of the screen, and then tap Search. Or, if you are using a mouse, point to the lower-right corner of the screen, and then click Search.
  2. Type msconfig in the search box, and then tap or click msconfig. A screenshot for this step.
  3. On the Services tab of the System Configuration dialog box, tap or click to select the Hide all Microsoft services check box, and then tap or click Disable all.
    A screenshot for this step.
  4. On the Startup tab of the System Configuration dialog box, tap or click Open Task Manager. A screenshot for this step.
  5. On the Startup tab in Task Manager, for each startup item, select the item and then click Disable. A screenshot for this step.
  6. Close Task Manager.
  7. On the Startup tab of the System Configuration dialog box, tap or click OK, and then restart the computer. A screenshot for this step.
Windows 7 and Windows Vista
  1. Log on to the computer by using an account that has administrator rights.
  2. Click Start, type msconfig.exe in the Start Search box, and then press Enter to start the System Configuration utility.
    Note If you are prompted for an administrator password or for confirmation, you should type the password or provide confirmation.
    A screenshot for this step.
  3. On the General tab, click the Selective startup option, and then click to clear the Load startup items check box. (The Use Original Boot.ini check box is unavailable.)
    A screenshot for this step.
  4. On the Services tab, click to select the Hide all Microsoft services check box, and then click Disable all.A screenshot for this step.
    Note This step lets Microsoft services continue to run. These services include Networking, Plug and Play, Event Logging, Error Reporting, and other services. If you disable these services, you may permanently delete all restore points. Do not do this if you want to use the System Restore utility together with existing restore points.
  5. Click OK, and then click Restart.
What is next when I have a clean boot environment?

After the computer is restarted, you will have a clean boot environment. Then, do one of the following, as appropriate for your situation:

  • If you could not install or uninstall a program or an update before you performed the clean boot, try to install or uninstall the program or update again.Note If you receive the “The Windows Installer service could not be accessed” error during the installation or uninstallation, follow How to start the Windows Installer service when system services are not loaded, and then install or uninstall the program or update again.
    • If the installation or uninstallation is successful, you have resolved your issue. Follow How to reset the computer to start as usual to reset your computer to the normal startup.
    • If the installation or uninstallation still fails, that means this issue is not caused by application or service interference. You may have to go to Microsoft Support for more specific support.
  • If you could not run a program before you performed the clean boot, try to run the program again.
How to reset the computer to start normally after clean boot troubleshooting

After you have finished troubleshooting, follow these steps to reset the computer to start normally.

Windows 10, Windows 8.1, and Windows 8
  1. From Start, search for msconfig. (In Windows 10, use the Search box from the Start menu. In Windows 8 or 8.1, wipe in from the right edge of the screen, and then tap Search. Or, if you are using a mouse, point to the lower-right corner of the screen, and then click Search.)
  2. Select msconfig or System Configuration from the search results.
  3. On the General tab, tap or click the Normal Startup option.
  4. Tap or click the Services tab, clear the check box beside Hide all Microsoft services, and then tap or click Enable all.
  5. ap or click the Startup tab, and then tap or click Open Task Manager.
  6. In task manager, enable all of your startup programs, and then tap or click OK.
  7. When you are prompted to restart the computer, tap or click Restart.
Windows 7 and Windows Vista
  1. Click Start, type msconfig.exe in the Start Search box, and then press Enter.
    Note If you are prompted for an administrator password or for confirmation, you should type the password or click Continue.
  2. On the General tab, click the Normal Startup option, and then click OK.
  3. When you are prompted to restart the computer, click Restart.

7 Windows Apps You Didn’t Know You Needed

Where to start? We know the feeling. The Windows Store has so many great apps, it can be hard to know where to begin and what you need. That’s where we come in. Below you’ll find 7 highly-rated apps that you may not have discovered yet.

Khan Academy

Khan Academy

Khan Academy allows you to learn almost anything for free. Our Windows app is the best way to view Khan Academy’s complete library of over 6000 videos on your Windows device. We cover a massive number of topics, including K-12 math, science topics such as biology, chemistry, and physics, and even the humanities with tutorials on finance and history.

Get the Khan Academy app

Aerize Optimizer

Aerize Optimizer

Get peak performance from with this advanced memory cleaner and performance optimizer. Built with proven and tested optimization techniques from the most effective and best selling system optimizer, Aerize Optimizer will ensure optimum device performance.

Get the Aerize Optimizer app

Duolingo

Duolingo

Learn Spanish, French, German, Portuguese, Italian, Irish, Dutch, Danish, and English. Totally fun and 100% free.

Get the Duolingo app

PicsArt

PicsArt

Creativity is more than just a photo filter—PicsArt provides you with everything you need to make amazing photo edits, artistic camera shoots, photo collages, create digital drawings, and communicate with other creatives who have joined our mission to beautify the world. 250 million people have already downloaded this free app for powerful image editing and photo montages, using hundreds of tools and effects that you can find only in professional photo editing programs. PicsArt inspires you to create beautiful images anytime, anywhere. Transform your photos into works of art and let the world discover them!

Get the PicsArt app

Seven – 7 Minute Workout Challenge

Seven – 7 Minute Workout Challenge

No workout equipment & just minutes a day.  Fun achievements and rewards to keep you motivated.  Based on the 7-minute workout featured in NY Times Magazine. Using nothing more than a chair, a wall, and your own body weight, the 7-minute workout is based on scientific studies to provide the maximum benefit of working out regularly in the shortest time possible.

Get the Seven – 7 Minute Workout Challenge app

WiFi Analyzer

WiFi Analyzer

WiFi Analyzer can help you to identify Wi-Fi problems, find the best channel or the best place for your router/access-point by turning your PC/laptop, tablet or mobile device into an analyzer for your wireless network.

Get the WiFi Analyzer app

Sticky Notes 8

Sticky Notes 8

With Sticky Notes 8 you can write notes and view them quickly on smartphones, tablets and PCs. You can pin notes like tiles on the Start screen, search notes, and add images.

Get the Sticky Notes 8 app

Why Your Home Wi-Fi Is Lousy

If you think your home Wi-Fi is annoying now—flaky, slow, riddled with dead zones—just wait until your streaming 4K TVs are battling phones, laptops, game systems and connected gadgets for the available bandwidth. The future depends on your home network, but even today’s best home networks aren’t ready.

I call this problem the home-spectrum crunch, and it’s a relatively new phenomenon. It’s a product of a 100-fold increase in demand for wireless bandwidth on home Wi-Fi networks in just the past five or so years.

In place of Web browsing on one or two devices—requiring less than 5 megabits per second—we now have streaming video and multiple Internet-connected devices consuming more than 100 megabits per second. The Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development in 2013 estimated that the average household with two teenagers had 10 Internet-connected devices. By 2017, the OECD projected the number would be 17; by 2022, it would climb to 50.

To grasp the problem, think of each Wi-Fi router as a stereo system. When there were fewer Wi-Fi hot spots and fewer gadgets connecting to them, the ambient noise was bearable. But if you’ve opened your laptop and lately seen dozens of Wi-Fi networks, you understand our modern conundrum: All those networks are essentially trying to shout over one another to be “heard” by connected devices.

Trond Wuellner, product manager for Google’s OnHub Wi-Fi router, says the average OnHub router can “hear” 16 other hot spots; one of every 20 OnHubs can hear 50 other hot spots.

The upshot: the more Wi-Fi hot spots, the worse the overall Wi-Fi experience for everyone. This is the reverse of what should be and the opposite of what happens in an office, where all the Wi-Fi hot spots are made to play nice with each other by expensive equipment from the likes of Cisco Systems.

Having a good home Wi-Fi network has become something of an arms race: Buy a newer, more powerful router and your service could improve, but at the expense of your neighbors.

The fact that nearly everyone who makes Wi-Fi routers is trying to tackle this problem, along with Google, your cable company and a raft of startups, demonstrates how in-home Wi-Fi connections have become a serious bottleneck.

One such player is Eero. Wall Street Journal personal-tech columnist Geoff Fowler found that Eero’s multi-node “mesh networking” solution works well even in challenging environments.

But a stock Eero setup might not be adequate in a future when homes routinely have gigabit connections, a 10-fold increase over what’s widely available today. That’s because, as Eero CEO Nick Weaver explains, when you’re at the edge of a mesh network, your connection is only as fast as the slowest link back to the base station.

One solution would be to add more antennas, or nodes, throughout your home. Unfortunately, Eero’s units currently cost $200 a pop.

A new competitor announcing itself on Monday, called Plume, has gathered wireless-industry veterans to create what it claims is a new kind of Wi-Fi, protected by 14 patents. The company calls it “adaptive Wi-Fi.”

Fahri Diner, CEO of Plume and a veteran executive of Siemens and Qtera, says Plume’s system will consist of many cheap, “dumb” antennas, enough for every room of a house, for a total cost of about $100.

If Plume can do that, it would be enough to make a wireless-networking geek swoon. But we won’t know for a while, because the company doesn’t plan to unveil its product or partners until the third quarter of this year.

Essentially, Plume and most of its rivals aim to take the technology behind expensive, enterprise-grade Wi-Fi systems for offices and make it cheap enough to use in your home.

Others are tackling the problem with wires, paradoxically. Comcast, the nation’s largest cable-TV provider, has quietly been testing systems that rely on the networks of coaxial cables spread across newer U.S. homes. The systems put multiple routers in different parts of a home to create a single seamless wireless network, says a company spokesman.

The biggest competitor of all in this space could soon be Alphabet’s Google. Mr. Diner said he believes Google is working on a mesh solution similar to Plume’s. Mr. Wuellner declined to comment on Google’s plans for future iterations of OnHub. But he said most industry players are moving from a single hub, like Google’s current offering, toward systems with multiple nodes.

Taken together, this means that the future of Wi-Fi in your home looks a lot like the present of Wi-Fi in your office. There will be antennas everywhere, possibly in every room. It will be insanely fast. It will be cheap, though you might have a new monthly bill, to pay Plume, Google, your cable provider or some other company for the cloud services required to manage your home network.

© Emily Prapuolenis/The Wall Street Journal

Given our increasing dependence on ever more wireless bandwidth, these companies are betting we’ll be happy to pay for the privilege.

Write to Christopher Mims at christopher.mims@wsj.com

Article by: The Wall Street Journal

How Good Is This $79 Computer?

Computers are officially dirt cheap. Yep, this one costs $79.

One reason the Endless Mini is so cheap is that this grapefruit-sized PC is sold on its own. You supply the keyboard, mouse and display yourself. The computer, built with developing countries in mind, doesn’t just hook into newer, flat-panel screens via HDMI—it also connects to older tube TVs by way of a composite video cable.

The Mini runs a Linux-based operating system which looks and works much like a tablet, with a row of app icons laid out in a grid on-screen.

Because Internet access isn’t a given (even in the U.S.), the Mini designed to be useful without a Web connection. Straight out of the box, it has more than 100 apps pre-installed, in your choice of English or Spanish. These apps span from K-12 education, to a free office suite, to games and even recipes.

Endless Mobile, the startup behind the Mini, focused most of the pre-loaded apps on education, with lessons and videos covering math, history, science, geography, animals, dinosaurs, and other subjects. There’s a massive encyclopedia and apps for editing Word docs, spreadsheets and PowerPoint-style presentations.

© Emily Prapuolenis/The Wall Street Journal

By being able to handle both school work and grown-up work, the Endless Mini is a viable option for people at any age who are looking for a low-cost, easy-to-use PC. This is a computer both children and grandparents could take to easily.

Google’s Chrome Web browser is installed too. But to use that, you need Internet connectivity. The Endless Mini comes in two configurations: a basic $79 model that relies on an Ethernet port for wired Internet access (and has 1GB of RAM and 24GB of internal storage). A $99 version adds Bluetooth and Wi-Fi connectivity (plus 2GB of RAM and 32GB of storage).

Both versions run on a 1.5GHz ARM processor—the sort of CPU more often found in low-end phones than PCs. If this isn’t your first computer, you might be frustrated by the Endless Mini’s slow loading of apps and Web pages. In real-world use, online games like “Cut the Rope” were stuttery but playable, and YouTube buffered like it always does, but videos played fine. Only Facebook , with all its photos and videos, left me genuinely annoyed.

One other problem: a software glitch in a pre-production device loaned to the tester by Endless for this review was unable to log into the device about halfway through testing. Endless supplied a replacement and it worked fine. The company says the issue has been fixed on the devices currently being shipped. But this hiccup is a reminder that Endless, founded in 2011, is a young, unproven company. Who knows how long Endless will be around or whether or not its take on Linux will be supported for decades to come?

In truth, this isn’t a computer built to last as long as an expensive laptop or desktop. It’s a $79 or $99 PC for people who haven’t been able to afford a computer at all before. Because of its ease of use and wealth of pre-installed, offline-friendly apps, its usefulness extends to anyone of who doesn’t have hundreds to spend. For that person, a $79 PC could be life changing.

Article from Wall Street Journal

How To Recover From iPhone Bad Upgrade

Q. Ever since I upgraded my iPhone to iOS 9.2.1, it’s been acting crazy. It powers off when I don’t want it to, then won’t let me shut if off when I try. How do I shake it out of this?
A. The latest update to Apple’s mobile operating system landed poorly on the iPhone 5s of the friend who sent this e-mail. The symptoms included not just those shutdown snafus but also weird behavior with scrolling and typing that she charitably summed up as “lots of very funky stuff going on.”
To fix that, you should try doing the update the old-fashioned way–through Apple’s iTunes desktop software.
I know, iTunes is nobody’s favorite app from Apple these days. But it also retains the singular ability to perform a complete backup of a phone, down to its saved passwords, and then reload your apps, data and settings intact after restoring the system software to factory condition.
So either fire up your own Mac or PC or that of a friend — you can also go to an Apple Store — and plug your iPhone into it. Select the phone in iTunes and click the buttons to set up a backup to “This computer” and to encrypt it, then click “Back Up Now.”
You’ll have to set a password to protect that backup, but OS X will offer to remember that for you. I won’t scold you if you write down that password, as long as the paper involved isn’t a Post-It note stuck to the monitor of a computer other people use.
After the backup finishes, click the “Restore iPhone” button to have iTunes erase the device, install a clean copy of the latest version of iOS and then put back your own apps, data and settings. That should generally work; see, for example, this report on Apple’s tech-support forums of a successful resolution via this route.
If your iPhone has descended into a state in which it won’t even turn on, try its “Recovery Mode.” Plug it into the computer, then press and hold its Sleep/Wake and Home buttons until it restarts and then goes from displaying a white Apple logo to showing the iTunes icon.
At that point, iTunes will open a dialog asking if you’d like to “Update” or “Restore” the device. The first will put a clean copy of iOS onboard while preserving your stuff; the latter will wipe the phone first before reinstalling iOS, so you’d best have a backup handy.
If you can’t even get that to work, you can try putting the device into “DFU” (Device Firmware Update) mode, in which no part of iOS runs and iTunes sees it as a blanked device that can only be restored to factory settings. For help with the somewhat tricky sequence of button pushes that invokes DFU mode, see Rene Ritchie’s walkthrough at iMore.
What if you have an Android device that’s been misbehaving? In Google’s mobile operating system, you can restore a device to stock condition in the Settings app: Tap “Backup & reset,” then tap “Factory Data Reset.”
You can also invoke Android’s own recovery mode if the phone has become too unstable to let you navigate to that part of the Settings app, but the procedure involved varies by phone, so you’ll have to check the documentation for your own model. (Sorry!)
Android and iOS, however, stop resembling each other once you try to get your old data back in place. Although much of your information should be automatically synced to the cloud services of Google and others, a lot of app-specific data is not, which can leave you stuck with some tedious reconstruction of your settings. (Sorry!)
Rob Pegoraro is a tech writer based out of Washington, D.C. To submit a tech question, e-mail Rob at rob@robpegoraro.com. Follow him on Twitter at twitter.com/robpegoraro